All About Hair Loss http://www.tacklinghairloss.com Products, Reviews, Tips, Hair Transplant directory Fri, 20 Apr 2018 10:50:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Sulfate Free Shampoos For African American Hair http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/african-american-hair/sulfate-free-shampoos-for-african-american-hair/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/african-american-hair/sulfate-free-shampoos-for-african-american-hair/#respond Fri, 20 Apr 2018 10:50:40 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=573 Always use Sulfate-Free hair products especially if you are African American.. Sulfate-Free shampoos for black and textured hair is not just a buzzword. It really is good for your hair ! Sulfates also know as SLS Sodium Laureth Sulfate (Wikipedia Link) is a heavy cleaning agent found in detergents and household items. Your daily shampoos also use them (although a […]

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Always use Sulfate-Free hair products especially if you are African American..

Sulfate-Free shampoos for black and textured hair is not just a buzzword. It really is good for your hair !

Sulfates also know as SLS Sodium Laureth Sulfate (Wikipedia Link) is a heavy cleaning agent found in detergents and household items. Your daily shampoos also use them (although a tiny amount) to create lather.

But here’s the kicker ….

Although it helps to clean your hair, the harsh salts in sulfates strip your hair of it’s natural oils.

This leaves multi-ethnic hair more vulnerable to breakage. Stop using sulfate shampoos for a week and notice the dramatic improvements in your hair.

Naturally Curly suggests that wavy and curly naturalists should completely avoid sulfate shampoos.

If you’ve been using sulfate based shampoos, it’s time to change your hair care regimen.

Here’s a good tip for you:

  • Get rid of all your sulfate and silicone shampoos and conditioners now!
  • Like I mentioned above, African-Native American hair is delicate. It gets dry easily and will break causing hair loss.
  • Do a deep conditioning at least once every 2 weeks and a protein treatment once a month to get your hair in good shape.
  • This will also balance out your hair.
  • Follow these tips for keeping your hair moisturized…
  • LOC (Liquid, Oil, Cream)
    LCO (Liquid, Cream, Oil)
    LOCS (Liquid, Oil, Cream, Sealant)
    These are common tricks used for African hair or biracial hair.

 

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7 Tips for African American Hair http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/female-hair-loss-information/7-tips-for-african-american-hair/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/female-hair-loss-information/7-tips-for-african-american-hair/#respond Fri, 20 Apr 2018 09:24:46 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=566 African-American hair is especially fragile and prone to injury and damage. More than half of African-American women will cite thinning hair or hair loss as their top hair concern. Fortunately, there is a lot African-Americans can do to help minimize damage and keep their hair beautiful. To help African-Americans keep their hair healthy, dermatologists recommend […]

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African-American hair is especially fragile and prone to injury and damage. More than half of African-American women will cite thinning hair or hair loss as their top hair concern. Fortunately, there is a lot African-Americans can do to help minimize damage and keep their hair beautiful.

To help African-Americans keep their hair healthy, dermatologists recommend the following tips:

  1. Wash hair once a week or every other week: This will help prevent build-up of hair care products, which can be drying to the hair.
  2. Use conditioner: Use conditioner every time you wash your hair. Be sure to coat the ends of the hair with conditioner, as the ends are the oldest and most fragile part of your hair.
  3. Use a hot oil treatment twice a month: This adds additional moisture and elasticity to your hair.
  4. Use a heat protecting product before styling: Adding this to wet hair before styling will help minimize heat damage.
  5. Use caution with relaxers: To minimize hair damage, always go to a professional hair stylist to ensure that the relaxer is applied safely. Touch-ups should only be done every two to three months and only to newly grown hair. Never apply relaxer to hair that has already been relaxed.
  6. Use ceramic combs or irons to press hair: If you would like to press or thermally straighten your hair, use a ceramic comb or iron and only do so once a week. Use a straightening device with a dial to ensure the device is not too hot. Use the lowest possible temperature setting that gives you the style you want. A higher temperature may be necessary for thicker, coarser hair.
  7. Make sure braids, cornrows or weaves are not too tight: If it hurts while your hair is being styled, ask the stylist to stop and redo it. Pain equals damage.

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Hair Growth: Science, Tips, Remedies and more http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-information/hair-growth-science-tips-remedies-and-more/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-information/hair-growth-science-tips-remedies-and-more/#respond Wed, 13 Jul 2016 21:19:47 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=539 How important are hair? To many who have them might not appreciate much but ask those who had them and they will tell you the desire to get them back. Healthy hair and head full of them adds confidence, sense of health, self confidence and more so the good times. I have tried to create […]

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How important are hair? To many who have them might not appreciate much but ask those who had them and they will tell you the desire to get them back. Healthy hair and head full of them adds confidence, sense of health, self confidence and more so the good times. I have tried to create a small sort of summary, not going in details but rather key points on each hair and hair growth related topics. Aim is to give you the summary of each and encourage you to explore more per your liking. So here we go

Hairs overview:

Anatomy of HairWhat is it: In men grows all over and are a sense of pride not so in women when we talk about all over. Science, protein filament, which grows from follicles found in dermis.

Hair Growth: As per WebMD at any time almost 90% of hair on ones scalp are growing. Each hair follicle goes through a life cycle comprising of three stages namely Anagen, Catagen and Telogen. Hair grows about an inch each month and this too depends on the age

Normal Hair Fall: Everyone loses hair everyday and upto 100 a day is considered normal. Please do not start counting 🙂

Men Hair loss starts without a disease:  Per Huffingtonpost, hair loss a symptom of aging and that is mostly genetic.  According to American Hair Loss Association men by age 35 experience some degree of hair loss and by 50 almost 85% have significant hair thinning.

Most common Cause in Men: Again as per American Hair Loss Association, male pattern Baldness accounts for the most common cause of hair loss or baldness.

Hair Loss evaluation:

Men: Medical evaluation, age and underlying systemic diseases and many more factors play a role in progression and hence evaluation.  In most cases visual scalp evaluation, pattern of loss helps predominantly to diagnose and guide in terms of treatment plans. Tests also play role when the clues are towards the systemic factors.

Female: Not as common as in men. Early onset is predominantly because of a systemic factor rather at hair or scalp level. Most common culprit are hormone imbalances and hence tests are of great value guided by detailed medical examination and history.

Enough covered about hair and the dry stuff, let’s move on to next, the ways one can get them growing and help stop or slow the progression of hair loss.

Hair Oils:

Castor hair oil, olive oil, sesame oil, argan oil, jojoba and coconut oil all have shown to be of help with healthy hair growth promotion but without any scientific proof or research backing. Their use have resulted in hair thickening, decrease in hair fall and decrease in dandruff, which does have a role in hair loss. Some of them have vitamins such as Vitamin E,  anti infectious properties along with anti-dht properties, which explains their role in combating hair loss and positive hair growth.

Vitamins for Hair Growth:

It is reported and many have scientific backing that Biotin, Vitamin C, B,Niacin all play a positive role in hair growth and their deficiency results in hair loss. Recent studies have also shown lack of Vitamin D or the sun vitamin can be a contributing factor in hair loss. Health experts agree that foods rich in vitamins and healthy eating habits benefit good healthy hair along with general well being. Vitamins along with iron, zinc results in stopping hair loss and hair regrowth.

Tips for Growing Hair Faster from the Internet:

  • Eat Healthy Diet rich in protein, vitamins and minerals
  • Use Hair Oils
  • Massage Scalp
  • Flip hair upside down
  • Stress free lifestyle to the maximum
  • Do not pollute your hair with unnecessary chemicals and colors
  • Avoid excessive sun exposure
  • Listen to your grandma for tips
  • Always seek medical advise before putting an unkown on your hair or scalp

I hope this was helpful and again the above or anything on the internet should not be taken as an alternate to expert medical advise and I encourage you to do your research and not take my word as a solution. I would appreciate your comments and suggestions and would be more then happy to answer any questions you might have.

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DHT and Hair loss http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-information/dht-and-hair-loss/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-information/dht-and-hair-loss/#respond Sun, 17 Apr 2016 18:59:28 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=533 We have heard and read a lot about DHT and its negative role when it comes to hair loss in both men and women. Here, we will try to explain what is DHT, how it causes hair loss, how one gets it, does its mere presence causes hair loss, how to diagnose and in the […]

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We have heard and read a lot about DHT and its negative role when it comes to hair loss in both men and women. Here, we will try to explain what is DHT, how it causes hair loss, how one gets it, does its mere presence causes hair loss, how to diagnose and in the end what measures can be taken to remedy and possible reverse its effects on hair.

What is DHT

It is a sex steroid present in needed quantities in both men and women. Primarily present as a product of testosterone via 5-alpha-reductase enzyme.  Its production occurs in testes, hair follicles and in adrenal gland. It has more potent attraction and binding to androgen receptor then testosterone.

Normal levels are necessary?

DHT stimulates male genitalia during embryogenesis, i.e. Baby boy penis. In adults acts as primary androgen at hair follicles and prostrate. Deficiency cause multitude of problems both during fetal development and in adult life span including lack of pubic and body hair.  This is mostly caused by enzyme deficiency because DHT is not produced but rather as explained is result of testosterone conversion.

Does only natural increase DHT occur?

Synthetic or artificially made DHT derivatives are used as anabolic steroids (by bodybuilders).

How it Causes Hair Loss

High levels of DHT in blood cause hair loss? NO. The reason behind male pattern baldness is local, hair follicle level conversion of DHT resulting in miniaturization of hair follicles. This also explains reduction in hair loss when shampoo or topical applications containing anti-DHT ingredients are used in male pattern baldness related hair loss.  Also of note is that in female hair loss such effect is not solely responsible for hair loss but is definitely a major contributing factor.

Does our body need DHT?

Yes. Normal levels helps counter effects of estrogen, which if unchecked can result is breast development or gynacomestia in men.  DHT have positive effect on Lipido, nervous system and increased resistance toward stress and physical stress.  It also play role in sleep and dream experience, especially the wet dreams. A surprising part is its usefulness as necessary for body hair growth and beard growth.

What can cause an increase in DHT levels?

Both increased testosterone, the pro hormone for DHT and increased levels of enzyme responsible for conversion from testosterone to DHT can be the cause.  Use of anabolic steroids, disease such as BPH (benign prostrate hypertrophy) , genetic,

What are DHT conversion inhibitors

The primary goal in treatment medically is to reduce levels of DHT, this is done via blocking the enzyme responsible for its conversion. 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors as an *off label use. DHTconversion inhibitors commonly prescribed by medical professionals in MPB are finiastride (approved) and Dutasteride (off Label Use).

*Off label use describe usage of a pharmaceutical agent for an unapproved indication.  

Signs of high DHT

High levels can cause aggression, strong sexual desire, strong response to rejection or negative criticism, male pattern baldness,

Wrong Myths about DHT

DHT does not cause impotence because it plays no role in negative feedback for sex hormones production, that role is of testosterone.

MPB is passed genetically from mother to child and not from the father. So better look at your mother’s father pictures then your father.

How to find if one has high levels

Reference: http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/81479

The DHT blood test is also known as Dihydrotestosterone, Androstaner-3-one and Hydroxy-5α. Fasting is not required for this test

Measures to counter its negative effects on hair growth

Diagnosed primary by appearance, male pattern baldness also known as androgenic alopecia contributes to the majority of hair loss in men.  The hair follicles become over sensitive to DHT and result in shortening and decreased life span.  Characterized by receding hair line and thinning of crown, resulting in only rim mimicking horseshoe.

male-pattern-baldness-3 Male Pattern Baldness

Keep in mind that MPB is not a disease and as mentioned sole increase in DHT blood levels does not cause hair loss but rather sensitivity to DHT at follicle level, which can be due to many factors including genetic.

Treatments:

  1. Finasteride (Propecia, Proscar)
  2. Minoxidil (Rogaine, Precision Spray)
  3. Dutasteride
  4. Head piece
  5. Hair Transplant

Topical Hair Products that can be of help in MPB

Shampoos:

  1. Regenepure DR with Ketoconazole
  2. Regenepure NT with Saw Palmetto
  3. Minoxidil Topical treatments with 5% minoxidil (Rogaine, Minoxidil Spray)
  4. Hair gels
  5. Hair Creams

What will not help?

  • Laser treatment
  • Hair thickening solutions
  • Snake oil
  • Blaming your father

Conclusion:

DHT plays a major and pivotal role in male pattern baldness and proper treatment both medical and topical can help slow its progression and in many case revert to natural hair growth.  In my opinion the main thing is proper diagnosis, early intervention and then utilization of available means to start the treatment with the least chances of side effects. Topical treatment, since not systemic, can be the initial starting course.

At the end, always seek expert medical advice before initiating any treatment of topical remedy. 

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Saw Palmetto and Androgenic Hair loss http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-experts/saw-palmetto-and-androgenic-hair-loss/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-experts/saw-palmetto-and-androgenic-hair-loss/#comments Tue, 05 Apr 2016 16:45:49 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=528 Because of wide spread hair loss problem, people often first turn to home or herbal remedies for tackling hair loss and regrow their hair back. Saw Palmetto Overview. Found primarily in the North American region.  Its berries are used to make medicine. Native Americans have been using Saw Palmetto berries for food and treatment of […]

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Because of wide spread hair loss problem, people often first turn to home or herbal remedies for tackling hair loss and regrow their hair back.

Saw Palmetto Overview.

Found primarily in the North American region.  Its berries are used to make medicine. Native Americans have been using Saw Palmetto berries for food and treatment of multitude of illnesses.

Best known for its use as a treatment for BPH symptoms and also used for infection. Colds, coughs, sore throat, asthma, erectile issues, and many more urinary tract related symptoms and diseases.

Saw palmetto safety profile is very good and have very few if any side effects. Mild side effects reported are nausea, headache, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea.

Saw Palmetto is not advised in pregnancy or breast feeding because of its hormone like properties.

As with any medicine, always seek expert advice before starting.

How Saw Palmetto Works:

  • Decreases DHT levels by inhibiting 5-alpha reductase. 5-alpha reductase (5AR) converts testosterone (found in both men and women, more so in men) to DHT or dihydrotestosterone.
  • Inhibit binding of DHT to receptors
  • Promote DHT breakdown

The evidence in androgenic alopecia (AGA):

Research in to hair loss prevention and hair growth is ongoing and promising (click here) and here, especially in the area of Androgenic Alopecia (AGA). In AGA one of the main culprit is increase DHT levels.

The main concept behind the hair loss treatment (AGA) is its ability to block an enzyme (5-alpha-reductase) which converts testosterone to DHT. Increase DHT levels increases prostate size in men and increase levels result in hair loss.  One of the explanation is that DHT attaches to androgenic receptors on follicles and result in their miniaturization (click here).

How to use saw palmetto for hair loss

Note; before deciding on any oral medicine, and or vitamins it is always advised to seek expert opinion.

Oral formulations are available as

160 mg to 320 mg a day as quoted by different medical sources. Many recommend starting at low dosage and then daily increasing but never exceeding 320 mg.

  • Dried whole berries
  • Part of multivitamins
  • Tablets
  • Liquid extracts
  • Powder capsules
  • Syrup
  • Tea

Topical forms

  • Shampoos such as Regenepure DR
  • Oils fortified with Saw palmetto
  • Saw palmetto oil with castors
  • Hair gel
  • Dropper forms
  • Creams

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What is the best Hair Loss Shampoo http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/answers-to-your-hair-questions/best-hair-loss-shampoo/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/answers-to-your-hair-questions/best-hair-loss-shampoo/#respond Mon, 30 Nov 2015 18:01:45 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=514 What is the best Hair Loss Shampoo was asked by: Junaid on 30/11/2015 in our opinion Regenepure shampoo, the Regenepure DR is by far the best hair loss shampoo in the market.

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What is the best was asked by: Junaid on 30/11/2015

in our opinion Regenepure shampoo, the Regenepure DR is by far the best hair loss shampoo in the market.

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Scalp Itching remedy with Vinegar http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/remedies/scalp-itching-remedy-with-vinegar/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/remedies/scalp-itching-remedy-with-vinegar/#respond Sat, 25 Apr 2015 11:35:08 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=503 Dandruff is a condition that causes the scalp to flake off, leaving white or yellowish clumps in the hair. Not only is this unsightly, but it’s also very itchy. A dry scalp is the primary cause of dandruff and scalp itch, which means moisture needs to be restored to it before you can see an […]

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Dandruff is a condition that causes the scalp to flake off, leaving white or yellowish clumps in the hair. Not only is this unsightly, but it’s also very itchy. A dry scalp is the primary cause of dandruff and scalp itch, which means moisture needs to be restored to it before you can see an improvement in your condition.

Applying Vinegar for scalp itching & Dandruff

Applying vinegar to the scalp is simple.

  • You only need apple cider vinegar and some water.
  • If you wish, include a 1/4 cup of dried herbs such as rosemary or thyme
  • Boil the vinegar, allow to cool
  • mix 1/8 cup to one cup of water before pouring onto your scalp before shampooing
  • Repeat this process after conditioning and don’t rinse

Word of Advise

Applying vinegar to the scamp should not cause any harmful effects, though it can sting your eyes. Also, vinegar fumes can be strong and irritating in the shower, so leave the door open or work over a sink to ensure you get enough air.

For severe scalp itching and dandruff, you might need a stronger treatment. Seek medical advice if you don’t see results within a few weeks.

You can also try following for Dandruff.

 

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UK Hair Loss Success Story by Michelle http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-uk/hair-loss-success-story-by-michelle/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-uk/hair-loss-success-story-by-michelle/#respond Sat, 25 Apr 2015 08:42:48 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=498 ‘There is definitely life after hair loss’ Michelle Chapman was diagnosed with alopecia areata when she was just five. She now devotes her time to raising awareness of alopecia, supporting others with the condition, and designing a stylish range of wigs. “I don’t know why, but I began losing my hair when I was just […]

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‘There is definitely life after hair loss’

Main-Cassie-Hair-Loss-StoryMichelle Chapman was diagnosed with alopecia areata when she was just five. She now devotes her time to raising awareness of alopecia, supporting others with the condition, and designing a stylish range of wigs.

“I don’t know why, but I began losing my hair when I was just five years old. It started slowly at first, just circular bald patches the size of a 10p piece. When I noticed lots of hair on my pillow, I began to ask questions. Mum took me to a dermatologist, who confirmed that I had alopecia areata. I didn’t understand what was happening to me.

“Over time, the bald patches grew larger and started to join together. By the time I was eight, I was wearing a wig.

“Then, just before I started secondary school when I was about 10, my hair started to grow back for no apparent reason. But I still had the bald patches, so I’d disguise these by strategically styling my hair. Before classes, a couple of friends would help to colour my head in with eyeliner pencils, otherwise my white scalp would shine through.

“I was 21 when my hair loss happened again. I was in the shower and suddenly ankle deep in water because my hair was clogging the plughole. I pretty much lost the lot in one go. I felt devastated. Just when I thought I was over it, it got me again. That’s one of the cruel things about alopecia.

“I eventually tried some wigs and chose a simple bob, just like the style I used to have. After a while, I began to get used to it and started to buy different types of wig.

“In 1996, I began my campaign to raise awareness of hair loss. When I was featured in a national newspaper, the response was incredible. Since then I was very fortunate to take part in a television documentary about Gail Porter, the television personality, who was diagnosed with alopecia in August 2005. It was wonderful meeting and working alongside Gail. Since then, the awareness for hair loss has increased dramatically.

“I’ve come a long way since those early years. I spend time as a volunteer for the charity Alopecia Awareness, which gives those experiencing hair loss the opportunity to communicate with others who understand the emotional trauma caused by the condition.

“To top it all off, I now work for a wig company. My time is divided between working alongside a number of NHS hospitals, where I attend specialist hair loss clinics, and designing a range of wigs. After all, I know how they should feel and what looks right.

“I now have around 50 wigs in my collection: red, brunette, blonde, black, long, short, straight, curly. The one I wear depends on where I’m going, what I’m doing, what I’m wearing and how I’m feeling. There is definitely life after hair loss.”

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Hair Loss from UK prospective http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-uk/hair-loss-from-uk-prospective/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-uk/hair-loss-from-uk-prospective/#respond Sat, 25 Apr 2015 08:38:23 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=494 Introduction Alopecia is the general medical term for hair loss. There are many types of hair loss with different symptoms and causes. Some of the more common types of hair loss are described below, including: male- and female-pattern baldness alopecia areata scarring alopecia anagen effluvium telogen effluvium Male- and female-pattern baldness Male-pattern baldness is the most […]

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Introduction

Alopecia is the general medical term for hair loss. There are many types of hair loss with different symptoms and causes.

Some of the more common types of hair loss are described below, including:

  • male- and female-pattern baldness
  • alopecia areata
  • scarring alopecia
  • anagen effluvium
  • telogen effluvium

Male- and female-pattern baldness

Male-pattern baldness is the most common type of hair loss, affecting around half of all men by 50 years of age. It usually starts around the late twenties or early thirties and most men have some degree of hair loss by their late thirties.

It generally follows a pattern of a receding hairline, followed by thinning of the hair on the crown and temples, leaving a horseshoe shape around the back and sides of the head. Sometimes it can progress to complete baldness, although this is uncommon.

Male-pattern baldness is hereditary, which means it runs in families. It’s thought to be caused by oversensitive hair follicles, linked to having too much of a certain male hormone.

As well as affecting men, it can sometimes affect women (female-pattern baldness). During female-pattern baldness, hair usually only thins on top of the head.

It’s not clear if female-pattern baldness is hereditary and the causes are less well understood. However, it tends to be more noticeable in women who have been through the menopause (when a woman’s periods stop at around age 52), perhaps because they have fewer female hormones.

Alopecia areata

Alopecia areata causes patches of baldness about the size of a large coin. They usually appear on the scalp but can occur anywhere on the body. It can occur at any age, but mostly affects teenagers and young adults.

In most cases of alopecia areata, hair will grow back in a few months. At first, hair may grow back fine and white, but over time it should thicken and regain its normal colour. Some people go on to develop a more severe form of hair loss, such as:

  • alopecia totalis (no scalp hair)
  • alopecia universalis (no hair on the scalp and body)

Alopecia areata is caused by a problem with the immune system (the body’s natural defence against infection and illness). It’s more common among people with other autoimmune conditions, such as anoveractive thyroid (hyperthyroidism), diabetes or Down’s syndrome.

It’s also believed some people’s genes make them more susceptible to alopecia areata, as one in five people with the condition have a family history of the condition.

Alopecia areata can occur at any age, although it’s more common in people aged 15-29. It affects one or two people in every 1,000 in the UK.

Scarring alopecia

Scarring alopecia, also known as cicatricial alopecia, is usually caused by complications of another condition. In this type of alopecia, the hair follicle (the small hole in your skin that an individual hair grows out of) is completely destroyed. This means your hair won’t grow back.

Depending on the condition, the skin where the hair has fallen out is likely to be affected in some way.

Conditions which can cause scarring alopecia include:

  • scleroderma – a condition affecting the body’s connective (supporting) tissues, resulting in hard, puffy and itchy skin
  • lichen planus – an itchy rash affecting many areas of the body
  • discoid lupus – a mild form of lupus affecting the skin, causing scaly marks and hair loss
  • folliculitis decalvans – a rare form of alopecia that most commonly affects men, causing baldness and scarring of the affected areas
  • frontal fibrosing alopecia – a type of alopecia that affects post-menopausal women where the hair follicles are damaged, and the hair falls out and is unable to grow back

Scarring alopecia occurs in both males and females, but is less common in children than adults. It accounts for about 7% of hair loss cases.

Anagen effluvium

Anagen effluvium is widespread hair loss that can affect your scalp, face and body.

One of the most common causes of this type of hair loss is the cancer treatment chemotherapy. In some cases, other cancer treatments – including immunotherapy and radiotherapy – may also cause hair loss.

The hair loss is usually noticeable within a few weeks of starting treatment. However, not all chemotherapy drugs cause hair loss and sometimes the hair loss is so small it’s hardly noticeable.

It may be possible to reduce hair loss from chemotherapy by wearing a special cap that keeps the scalp cool. However, scalp cooling is not always effective and not widely available.

In most cases, hair loss in anagen effluvium is temporary. Your hair should start to grow back a few months after chemotherapy has stopped.

Telogen effluvium

Telogen effluvium is a common type of alopecia where there is widespread thinning of the hair, rather than specific bald patches. Your hair may feel thinner, but you’re unlikely to lose it all and your other body hair isn’t usually affected.

Telogen effluvium can be caused by your body reacting to:

  • hormonal changes, such as those that take place when a woman is pregnant
  • intense emotional stress
  • intense physical stress, such as childbirth
  • a short-term illness, such as a severe infection or an operation
  • a long-term illness, such as cancer or liver disease
  • changes in your diet, such as crash dieting
  • some medications, such as anticoagulants (medicines that reduce the ability of your blood to clot) or beta-blockers (used to treat a number of conditions, such as high blood pressure)

In most cases of telogen effluvium, your hair will stop falling out and start to grow back within six months.

How is hair loss treated?

More common types of hair loss, such as male-pattern baldness, don’t need treatment because they’re a natural part of ageing and don’t pose a risk to your health.

However, any type of hair loss can be distressing, so you should see your GP if you’re worried about it.

Your GP should be able to diagnose your type of hair loss by examining your hair. They can also discuss possible treatments with you so it’s advisable to visit your GP before trying a private consultant dermatologist (skin care specialist).

If you want treatment for male-pattern baldness for cosmetic reasons, two medications called finasteride and can be used. Minoxidil can also be used to treat female-pattern baldness.

However, these treatments don’t work for everyone and only work for as long as they’re continued. They are not available on the NHS and can be expensive.

Alopecia areata is usually treated with steroid injections, although it’s sometimes possible to use a steroid cream, gel or ointment. A treatment called immunotherapy may also be used. This involves stimulating hair growth by causing an intentional allergic reaction in the affected areas of skin.

If you have significant hair loss of any type, you may decide to wear a wig. Wigs are available on the NHS, but you may have to pay unless you qualify for help with charges.

There are also some surgical options for hair loss, including a hair transplant and artificial hair implants.

Read more about treating hair loss.

Emotional issues

Hair loss can be difficult to come to terms with. The hair on your head can be a defining part of your identity. If you start to lose your hair, it can feel as if you’re losing part of your identity. This can affect your self-confidence and sometimes lead to depression.

Speak to your GP if you’re finding it difficult to deal with your hair loss. They may suggest counselling. You may also benefit from joining a support group or speaking to other people in the same situation – for example, through online forums.

A number of charities, such as Alopecia UK, have support groups and online forums where you can talk to others who are experiencing hair loss.

Treating hair loss

Although hair loss rarely needs to be treated, many people seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

Many cases of hair loss are temporary (for example, due tochemotherapy), or are a natural part of ageing and don’t need treatment. However, hair loss can have an emotional impact, so you may want to look at treatment if you’re uncomfortable with your appearance.

If hair loss is caused by an infection or another condition, such as lichen planus or discoid lupus, treating the underlying problem may help prevent further hair loss.

Male-pattern baldness

Male-pattern baldness isn’t usually treated, as the treatments available are expensive and don’t work for everyone.

Two medicines that may be effective in treating male-pattern baldness are:

  • finasteride
  • minoxidil

Neither treatment is available on the NHS.

You may also want to consider wearing a wig or having surgery.

Finasteride

Finasteride is available on private prescription from your GP. It comes as a tablet you take every day.

It works by preventing the hormone testosterone being converted to the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT causes the hair follicles to shrink, so blocking its production allows the hair follicles to regain their normal size.

Studies have suggested finasteride can increase the number of hairs people have (hair count) and can also improve how people think their hair looks.

It usually takes three to six months of continuously using finasteride before any effect is seen. The balding process usually resumes within six to 12 months if treatment is stopped.

Side effects for finasteride are uncommon. Less than one in 100 men who take finasteride experience a loss of sex drive (libido) or erectile dysfunction (the inability to get or maintain an erection).

Minoxidil

Minoxidil is available as a lotion you rub on your scalp every day. It’s available from pharmacies without a prescription. It’s not clear how minoxidil works, but evidence suggests it can cause hair regrowth in some men.

The medication contains either 5% or 2% minoxidil. Some evidence suggests the stronger version (5%) is more effective. Other evidence has shown this is no more effective than the 2% version. However, the stronger version may cause more side effects, such as dryness or itchiness in the area it’s applied.

Like finasteride, minoxidil usually needs to be used for several months before any effect is seen. The balding process will usually resume if treatment with minoxidil is stopped. Any new hair that regrows will fall out two months after treatment is stopped. Side effects are uncommon.

Female-pattern baldness

Minoxidil is currently the only medicine available to treat female-pattern baldness.

Minoxidil lotion may help hair grow in around one in four women who use it, and it may slow or stop hair loss in other women. In general, women respond better to minoxidil than men. As with men, you need to use minoxidil for several months to see any effect.

Alopecia areata

There is no completely effective treatment for alopecia areata. However, in most cases the hair grows back after about a year without treatment. So “watchful waiting” is sometimes best, particularly if you just have a few small patches of hair loss.

Some treatments for alopecia areata are outlined below.

Corticosteroid injections

Corticosteroids are medicines containing steroids, a type of hormone. They work by suppressing the immune system (the body’s natural defence against infection and illness). This is useful in alopecia areata because the condition is thought to be caused by the immune system damaging the hair follicles.

Corticosteroid injections appear to be the most effective treatment for small patches of alopecia. As well as your scalp, they can also be used in other areas, such as your eyebrows.

A corticosteroid solution is injected several times into the bald areas of skin. This stops your immune system from attacking the hair follicles. It can also stimulate hair to grow again in those areas after about four weeks. The injections are repeated every few weeks. Alopecia may return when the injections are stopped.

Side effects of corticosteroid injections include pain at the injection site and thinning of your skin (atrophy).

Topical corticosteroids

Topical corticosteroids (creams and ointments) are widely prescribed for treating alopecia areata, but their long-term benefits are not known.

They are usually prescribed for a three-month period. Possible corticosteroids include:

  • betamethasone
  • hydrocortisone
  • mometasone

These are available as a lotion, gel or foam depending on which you find easiest to use. However, they cannot be used on your face, for example on your beard or eyebrows.

Possible side effects of corticosteroids include thinning of your skin and acne.

Corticosteroids tablets aren’t recommended because of the risk of serious side effects.

Minoxidil lotion

Minoxidil lotion is applied to the scalp and can stimulate hair regrowth after about 12 weeks. However, it can take up to a year for the medication to take full effect.

Minoxidil is licensed to treat both male- and female-pattern baldness, but is not specifically licensed to treat alopecia areata. This means it hasn’t undergone thorough medical testing for this purpose.

Minoxidil is not recommended for those under 18 years old. It’s not available on the NHS, but can be prescribed privately or bought over the counter.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy may be an effective form of treatment for extensive or total hair loss, although fewer than half of those who are treated will see worthwhile hair regrowth.

A chemical solution called diphencyprone (DPCP) is applied to a small area of bald skin. This is repeated every week using a stronger dose of DPCP each time. The solution eventually causes an allergic reaction and the skin develops mild eczema (dermatitis). In some cases, this results in hair regrowth after about 12 weeks.

A possible side effect of immunotherapy is a severe skin reaction. This can be avoided by increasing the DPCP concentration gradually. Less common side effects include a rash and patchy-coloured skin (vitiligo). In many cases, the hair falls out again when treatment is stopped.

Immunotherapy is only available in specialised centres. You’ll need to visit the centre once a week for several months. After DPCP has been applied, you’ll need to wear a hat or scarf over the treated area for 24 hours because light can interact with the chemical.

Dithranol cream

Similar to immunotherapy, dithranol cream is applied regularly to the scalp before being washed off. It causes a skin reaction, followed by hair regrowth in some cases.

However, it hasn’t been proven that dithranol cream is significantly effective in the long term. It can also cause itchiness and scaling of the skin and can stain the scalp and hair. For these reasons, dithranol is not widely used.

Ultraviolet light treatment

Two to three sessions of light therapy (phototherapy) are given every week in hospital. The skin is exposed to ultraviolet (UVA or UVB) rays. In some cases, before your skin is exposed to UV light you may be given a medicine called psoralen, which makes your skin more sensitive to the light.

The results of light therapy are often poor. The treatment can take up to a year to produce maximum results and responses vary, with a high relapse rate. It’s often not a recommended treatment because side effects can include:

  • nausea (feeling sick)
  • pigment changes to the skin
  • an increased risk of skin cancer

Tattooing

For many people, it’s possible to replicate hair with a tattoo. This is known as dermatography and generally produces good long-term results, although it is usually expensive and can only be used to replicate very short hair.

This is usually carried out for eyebrows over a few hourly sessions and can even be used as a treatment for scalp hair loss caused by male-pattern baldness.

Wigs

Wigs can be a useful treatment for people with extensive hair loss.

Synthetic wigs

The cheapest wigs are made from acrylic and can cost anywhere between £60 and £300. As of April 2014, an NHS stock acrylic wig costs £66.70.

Acrylic wigs last for six to nine months. They’re easier to look after than wigs made of real hair because they don’t need styling. However, acrylic wigs can be itchy and hot, and need to be replaced more often than wigs made from real hair.

Read about wigs and fabric supports costs for information on who is entitled to free wigs on the NHS, and who can get help with costs.

Real hair wigs

Some people prefer the look and feel of wigs made from real hair even though they are more expensive, costing anywhere between £200 and £2,000. As of April 2014, an NHS partial human hair wig costs £176.65 and an NHS full human hair wig made to order costs £258.35.

Real hair wigs last for three to four years, but are harder to maintain than synthetic wigs because they may need to be set and styled by a hairdresser and professionally cleaned.

A human hair wig is only available on the NHS if you’re allergic to acrylic, or if you have a skin condition made worse by acrylic. You may wish to buy your wig privately.

Alopecia UK has useful information about synthetic wigs and human hair wigs, including advice about choosing the right wig and how to care for it.

Complementary therapy

Aromatherapy, acupuncture and massage are often used for alopecia, but there isn’t enough evidence to support their use as effective treatments.

Hair loss surgery

Most men and women considering hair loss surgery have male-pattern or female-pattern baldness. However, surgery is sometimes suitable for a range of alopecia conditions.

Surgery for hair loss should only be considered after trying less invasive treatments, and it’s not usually available on the NHS.

The success of hair loss surgery depends on the skill of the surgeon, as complications can arise. It’s best to speak to your GP for advice before seeking out a surgeon in the private sector.

The main types of hair loss surgery are explained below.

Hair transplant

Under local anaesthetic (painkilling medication), a small piece of scalp (about 1cm wide and 30-35cm long) is removed from an area where there’s plenty of hair. The piece of scalp is divided into single hairs or tiny groups of hairs, which are grafted onto areas where there’s no hair.

Stitches are not needed to attach the grafts because they are held in place by the clotting (thickening) action of the blood when the hairs are inserted. Fine hairs are placed at the front of the scalp and thicker hairs towards the back in a process called grading. This helps achieve a more natural result. Within six months, the hair should settle and start to regrow.

Hair transplants are carried out over a number of sessions. There should be a break of nine to 12 months between procedures. As with any type of surgery, there is a risk of infection and bleeding, which can lead to hair loss and noticeable scarring.

Hair transplantation isn’t provided by the NHS. It can be expensive and take a long time.

Scalp reduction

Scalp reduction involves removing pieces of bald scalp from the crown and the top of the head to move hairy parts of the scalp closer together. This can be done by cutting out loose skin and stitching the scalp back together, or it can be done by tissue expansion.

Tissue expansion is where a balloon is placed underneath the scalp and inflated over several weeks to expand the skin in stages. The balloon is then removed and the excess skin is cut out.

Scalp reductions are not suitable for hair loss at the front of the scalp because it can cause scarring. There is also the risk of infection in the area.

Scalp reduction isn’t usually used for male-pattern baldness, but it’s available on the NHS to people with scarring alopecia. Surgery should only be carried out after any underlying conditions have cleared up.

Artificial hair

Artificial hair implantation is marketed as a treatment for male-pattern baldness. It involves implanting synthetic fibres into the scalp under local anaesthetic. The technique is not available on the NHS.

Artificial hair implantation carries serious risks of infection and scarring, but clinics may be reluctant to inform people of the possible complications to avoid losing potential clients.

Artificial hair implantation isn’t recommended by dermatologists because of the risk of complications such as:

  • infection
  • scarring
  • synthetic fibres falling out

People considering hair loss surgery should explore more established treatments, such as hair transplantation and scalp reduction, because the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are better understood.

Cloning

The latest research into hair loss treatments is studying hair cell cloning. The technique involves taking small amounts of a person’s remaining hair cells, multiplying them, and injecting them into bald areas.

Cloning is intended to treat both male- and female-pattern baldness. However, the science behind the technique is new and more trials are needed before it can be fully assessed.

Emotional support

If you need emotional support following hair loss, you can contact the charity Alopecia UK. An online forum is available where you can talk to other people with alopecia, and a network of support groups exists across the country.

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Mesotherapy in hair loss http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-information/mesotherapy-in-hair-loss/ http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/hair-loss-information/mesotherapy-in-hair-loss/#respond Sat, 18 Apr 2015 09:57:32 +0000 http://www.tacklinghairloss.com/?p=488 Chances of result with Mesotherapy are 90-92% as apposed to commonly used Minoxidil (Rogaine) only 50%. Mesotherapy in hair loss An effective time-release delivery system that can improve blood circulation, reduce inflammation, neutralize excess DHT, stimulate collagen, increase follicle size to stop hair loss and stimulate hair growth. Active Ingredients Acetyl tetrapeptide-3 & Biochanin A […]

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Chances of result with Mesotherapy are 90-92% as apposed to commonly used (Rogaine) only 50%.

mesotherapy-before-1

Mesotherapy in hair loss

An effective time-release delivery system that can improve blood circulation, reduce inflammation, neutralize excess DHT, stimulate collagen, increase follicle size to stop hair loss and stimulate hair growth.

Active Ingredients Acetyl tetrapeptide-3 & Biochanin A

Acetyl tetrapeptide-3: alternative to Minoxidil

Reduces the inflammation process stops hair loss and stimulates the hair growth (comparative study to minoxidil) modulates DHT, stimulates the extra cellular matrix and anchoring proteins. Acetyl tetrapeptide-3 stimulates tissue remodeling and has a direct effect on the hair follicle. The remodeling signal will increase the size of hair follicle for better hair anchoring and vitality.

Most forms of hair loss are caused by

  • hormone imbalances in and around the hair follicle
  • a lack of the right nutrients
  • reduced blood circulation

What is Mesotherapy?

Mesotherapy is a non-invasive technique based on superficial microinjections, just below the epidermis, into the target tissues. The term «meso» is derived from the mesoderm or middle layer of the skin (approx. 1 mm deep). Mesotherapy is a treatment that stimulates the mesoderm, which relieves a wide variety of symptoms and ailments.

The solution injected can contain a wide range of minerals, vitamins, amino acids, nucleic acids and co-enzymes that can be tailored to each patient’s individual needs.

Mesotherapy for hair loss is used with great success in Europe and the United States. The treatment is virtually painless and safe when done professionally. There is no dressing or local anaesthesia required. After the treatment you can just go back to work.

Today we know that Mesotherapy is as effective or more effective than tablets in hair rejuvenation and restoration.

Mesotherapy brings just the right materials to the exact place where it is needed (around the hair follicle) so that

  • the hair follicle can grow and survive,
  • the excess of DHT (dihydrotestosterone) is neutralised and
  • the blood circulation is stimulated.

History of Mesotherapy

In 1952 Dr Michel Pistor treated the cobbler for an asthma attack with procaine, in his village of Bray et Lu. This treatment had a limited effect on the underlying disease although the patient, who had been deaf for many years, was able to hear the village bells ring again. He then thought of continuing the procaine treatment but administered next to the ear with positive results. It was from this finding that he continued a never ending quest to treat the disease from as close a point as possible. And according to his saying “a little, not very often, in the right spot”.

In 1964 the French Society of Mesotherapy was founded in Paris, with 16 members and The French Academy of Medicine recognized Mesotherapy as a Specialty of Medicine in 1987.

Popular throughout European countries and South America, Mesotherapy is practiced by approximately 40.000 physicians worldwide.

The Treatment

The treatment itself takes between 10 and 30 minutes depending on the extension of the area being treated.

Usually a minimum of 10 sessions is required to stimulate hair growth. We recommend starting with an intensive course of treatments every 2 weeks for the first 2-3 months. The frequency then gradually decreases and the results of hair rejuvenation become evident already after 2-3 months. In order to keep the results maintenance treatments are needed generally once every 2 to 3 months.

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